From the Bay of Islands to the Bay of Plenty, and the west coast wherever some structure can be found, there is no shortage of these magnificent fighting fish.

While some kings are hooked by accident while dropping baits for snapper, they are easily targeted. For those anglers who like tossing lures you can cast stick baits or poppers around channel marker buoys, for kings will always be found hanging around such obstacles. They like anything which breaks up the flow of strong currents, even the thick wire which anchors the large buoys. The best time to try this fishing is at dead low tide, when the kings venture closer to the surface. Jigs dropped down deep beside the buoys and rapidly retrieved will also attract kings, and the more action a jig displays the more likely they are to bite, so a vigorous action on the rod is recommended.

Another approach is to rig a dead piper on a short trace with a single live-bait hook through the head and a small ball sinker sliding above it. The beak of the piper can be poked into the hole in the sinker to hold it in place, and this bait is easily cast and should be wound in steadily. A jerk of the rod tip will vary the swimming action, and the piper works best when slid across the surface, simulating a live fish trying to escape.

Those anglers targeting large kings will drop live baits to the bottom when drifting over a deep pinnacle, and lively baits like a slimy mackerel or kahawai will provoke more strikes than more sluggish fish like jack mackerel or sprats. But they will all catch fish when the kings are in the mood. The live bait shoud be hooked through the nose so it can be pulled down by the sinker. When presented on the surface, tethered to a balloon, the bait is hooked through the skin in front of the dorsal fin. And the balloon should be attached to the top of the swivel between the line and trace, and if dental floss is used it can break away when a fish is hooked. Similarly, the sinker can be attached to the swivel with floss when sending a bait down deep, so the sinker can break off and you can play the fish without the weight on the line.

Speed jigging is another popular method of fishing over pinnacles and reefs, and kings are easily identified on the screen of the fish finder as a red mass on top of the rock or reef. It is then up to the skipper to position the boat so it drifts over the school of fish, taking into account the direction of the tidal current and wind.

Another approach which is gaining in popularity is to wade the shallows and look for cruising sting rays. Kingfish will follow a ray, waiting for it to disturb a small flounder which they chase and catch. Small flounder, called dabs, are popular prey for many predators including snapper.

Geoffs Tip

Kingfish are tough fish and are easily released but will have a better chance of survival if a tool is used to remove the hook while the fish is still in the water.

Article by: Geoff Thomas